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What’s next for the Michigan Legislature

Advocacy News – Nov. 17, 2023 

The Michigan Legislature formally adjourned this week until 2024. Although no policy changes will move between now and Jan. 1, the Michigan Chamber continues to work hard behind the scenes to address member interests and concerns on key legislative issues. We know that when businesses can grow and thrive, so do Michiganders, our communities and our economy.

Here’s a dive into a few key business issues we expect to be working on in early 2024:

Energy and Environment: 

  • “Polluter Pay” legislation – Despite having existing requirements for businesses to clean-up any on-site contamination in Michigan statute, Senate Bills 605-611 and House Bills 5242-5247 would create new barriers to brownfield and economic development and financially burden certain companiesthat handle regulated chemicals. Read more about this bill and how they would impact businesses here.

For questions or more information on bills related to energy and environment, please contact Mike Alaimo at malaimo@michamber.com

Employment Law and Opportunities to Sue:

  • One-size-fits-all paid leave mandate – Senate Bills 332-333 and House Bills 4574-4575 create an expansive state-administered paid leave insurance program financed through a new tax on employers and, in some instances, employees. This proposal would impact every employer and would raise taxes on employers by an estimated $1 to $1.5 billion per year. To read more about these bills and the MI Chamber’s position, click here.
  • Local employment laws – Senate Bill 171 and House Bill 4237 would allow Michigan’s 1,800 local units of government to create their own unique sets of workplace labor rules and regulations, creating significant issues and barriers for businesses to operate in the Great Lakes State. To read more on the MI Chamber’s analysis, click here.
  • New opportunities to sue employers – House Bills 5199-5205 create new and costly litigation against over 80 different regulated businesses, trades and professions under the Michigan Consumer Protection Act by eliminating the “regulatory compliance exemption.” To see if your business may fall under this legislation and to read more about this harmful proposed policy change, click here.

For questions or more information on employment law and civil justice policies before Michigan’s Legislature, please contact Wendy Block at wblock@michamber.com.

Tax:

  • Research and Development (R&D) Tax Credit – Although the bipartisan R&D tax credit, House Bills 5099-5102 and 4368, only moved out of the Michigan House this year, we are hopeful that this legislation as passed will be taken up by the Michigan Senate in 2024. This legislation would allow Michigan to increase its competitiveness at the national level by attracting and retaining industries that are inventing our future. See more MI Chamber comments on this legislation here.
  • Growing Michigan Together Council – Although formal recommendations have not yet been outlined by Gov. Whitmer’s Growing Michigan Together Council, which was formed earlier this year to tackle Michigan’s troublesome declining population, there are likely to be recommendations that include changes to Michigan’s current tax policies and climate. The Michigan Chamber and its Tax Policy and Economic Competitiveness Committee will thoroughly vet the Council’s recommendations.

For questions or more information on all things tax policy  and economic development, please contact Leah Robinson at lrobinson@michamber.com.

The Michigan Chamber is also a founder member of the Great Lakes Growth Coalition, a dedicated effort to provide a unified voice for Michigan’s job providers and workers, ensuring that our residents live in a flourishing state with a growing economy and population and to push back against anti-business, anti-worker and anti-growth legislation that threatens the ability of our state to make progress. To learn more or get involved, visit greatlakesgrowth.com.