Human Resources

U.S. Supreme Court Agrees to Review a School Transgender Case

On Friday October 28, 2016, the United States Supreme Court agreed to review a major transgender case. The case involves a 15-year-old Virginia high school student who, two years ago, declared himself to be a transgender male. His school granted him permission to use the boys’ restroom, and he did so until the school received numerous complaints from others. The local school board responded with a policy requiring students to use the restroom that matched the gender on their birth certificate, not their gender identity.

FMLA Pitfalls

Decades after its initial passage, the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) continues to be one of the most difficult employment laws for employers to manage in the workplace. The law is complex and often disruptive to business operations. However, it gives employees a substantial number of benefits and protections, regardless of the impact on the employer. Here are three of the most common pitfalls facing employers:

Are You Following Your Fiduciary Duties?

Retirement plans should be a benefit to you, your employees and your company as a whole. By following ERISA, the Internal Revenue Code and especially the fiduciary duties, your retirement plan can be more of a benefit than a burden. Although the underlying law is 30 years old, changes occur regularly. Here is a look at five issues that can be troublesome, but need not be, with a little attention.

Avoiding Recruitment Pitfalls

Recruitment is in full swing in the state of Michigan. According to the Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget, the national jobless rate is at 4.9%. The rates are even lower in Michigan at 4.5%, as of July 2016. With a tight job market and steep competition by other employers, the potential of making a bad hire increases. A bad hire can cost your company in a lot of ways: lost productivity, missed development opportunities, negative client service, low employee morale and accumulated costs for hiring and training. Every person is not cut out for every job.

Mishandled Garnishments Become Direct Liability for Employers

Numerous laws require employers to divert wages away from the employee to another person or entity. Judgment creditors, bankruptcy courts, and child support enforcement agencies are just a few. Because there are so many such laws and they differ from state to state, it is a big task for employers to always and accurately comply. Despite the difficulty and administrative cost, laws rarely cut the employer a break.