Human Resources

MI Chamber Champions Repeal of "HICA Tax"

The Michigan Chamber on June 8 issued the following statement in response to nearly unanimous passage of legislation championed by the Michigan Chamber to repeal Michigan’s unique and uncompetitive Health Insurance Claims Assessment, or “HICA Tax” (Senate Bills 987-990). The HICA Tax is a 0.75 percent tax on paid health insurance claims.  It is paid by individuals and businesses alike and has added nearly $1 billion to the cost of health insurance since its enactment in 2011.

Are You Ready to E-Verify?

E-Verify logo

E-Verify is a fast, free, and easy-to-use internet-based service run by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and partnership with the Social Security Administration that allows employers to verify the eligibility of their newly hired employees to legally work in the United States. It is important that employers understand E-Verify and employee rights during the federal employment eligibility verification processes.

True or False: The minimum wage for Michigan employees is $8.50 per hour

With all the media coverage of federal and state minimum wage laws, do you know if the above statement is true or false? It is true: for most employees working in Michigan, the 2016 minimum wage is $8.50 per hour.  

However, it is false for some employees:

Tipped Employees: The employer is not required to pay minimum wage to tipped employees if all of these apply:

Silver Lining in EEOC’s Continuing Quest to make Employees Untouchable?

In January 2016, the EEOC issued its proposed enforcement guidance on retaliation charges filed by employees. The public comment period for the proposed guidance is now closed. If you haven’t gone through it yet, settle in, make yourself comfortable and read the 73-page proposed guidance.

Pay Docking for Salaried Employees

Docking the pay of exempt employees is only permissible in certain circumstances. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) governs wage and hour laws of nonexempt employees. The law requires employers to pay nonexempt employees at least the federal minimum wage and requires the payment of overtime for an employee who works more than 40 hours in a week. Employees who are exempt from the law are not entitled to overtime or the federal minimum wage, but employers may not make improper pay deductions from their salary.