Oppose
Employer Rights

Repeal Right-to-Work Law

Staff Contact

Wendy Block

Vice President of Business Advocacy and Member Engagement

(517) 371-7678 | wblock@michamber.com

Summary of Bill & What It Means to You

B 4033HB 4034: Repeals Michigan’s 2012 Right-to-Work law which ensures workplace fairness and equality by giving every employee the ability to decide for themselves if joining or financially supporting a union is the right choice for them.

Chamber Position

OPPOSE. Michigan’s Right-to-Work law is good public policy that protects all employees from being forced to join a union and pay dues against their will. It does not prohibit a union’s right to exist or prevent collective bargaining.

Bill Sponsors

This bill is a

Primary Sponsor: Rep. JOHN CHIRKUN, (District 22)

Additional Supporter
Reps. John Chirkun, Brian Elder, Terry Sabo, William Sowerby, Sara Cambensy, Lori Stone, Kevin Hertel, Nate Shannon, Ronnie Peterson, Kristy Pagan, Matt Koleszar, John Cherry, Laurie Pohutsky, Yousef Rabhi, Cynthia Johnson, Donna Lasinski,

Primary Sponsor: Rep. BRIAN ELDER, (District 96)

Additional Supporter
Reps. Brian Elder, John Chirkun, Terry Sabo, William Sowerby, Sara Cambensy, Lori Stone, Kevin Hertel, Nate Shannon, Ronnie Peterson, Sarah Anthony, Kara Hope, Joseph Tate, Karen Whitsett, Issac Robinson, Sheldon Neeley, Kristy Pagan, Matt Kolesz

Related Issues

Support
Unemployment Insurance Changes In Response To COVID-19

SB 886:  This legislation would continue “non-charging” employers for COVID-19 related UI benefits, authorize increased flexibility for employers participating in the WorkShare program and ensure individuals filing an initial state claim for UI benefits could receive up to 26 weeks of benefits.  These provisions would continue through December 31, 2020—but the legislature could always pass legislation at a future date to continue these provisions further.

Oppose
Repeal Right-to-Work Law

B 4033HB 4034: Repeals Michigan’s 2012 Right-to-Work law which ensures workplace fairness and equality by giving every employee the ability to decide for themselves if joining or financially supporting a union is the right choice for them.

Oppose
$16 Minimum Wage

Takes wage decisions out of employers’ hands and establishes a minimum wage rate of $16 per hour for individuals with five years of “relevant” work experience and a high school diploma or equivalency certificate.

Oppose
$12 Minimum Wage

Would increase the minimum wage to $12 per hour over four steps, raising labor costs significantly.