Human Resources

Effects of Same-Sex Marriage Rulings on Employee Benefits

On June 26, 2013 in United States v. Windsor, the United States Supreme Court opined that certain portions of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) - the act barring the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages - were unconstitutional. Consequently, same sex couples with a valid state marriage license are generally considered spouses under the new law.

Background Check Risks-Beware!

There seem to be a growing number of laws and individual state/county/city restrictions being placed on employers who want to build safe and reliable workforces via a program of background checks.  On top of this, employers are being sued left and right because they aren’t conducting background checks in compliance with federal and local laws.

Here are 3 very important items to keep in mind:

HR Harassment Scenario – Did You Violate Federal Law?

Imagine you are the Human Resources Manager at one of the “Top 100 Best Workplaces” in the state and that your company has a state of the art anti-harassment / anti-discrimination policy. You train all your employees about this policy every year demanding that employees treat each other with dignity and respect and have worked very hard to create a work environment where all employees know about, understand and believe that the company is sincere about providing a harassment/discrimination free workplace.

Is Pregnancy a Disability?

Although pregnancy is not defined as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or the Michigan Persons with Disabilities Civil Rights Act (PWDCRA), a pregnant employee may suffer from complications that render her disabled or handicapped within the meaning of those statutes. Once a pregnant employee receives medical certification that she is disabled from working, she is likely protected under disability laws.

Top 3 Employment Law Issues for 2016

Here is a look at three of the top employment law issues human resources departments will likely face in 2016:

UGH! Now They Want Wage Info on the EEO-1?

On Jan. 29, the White House announced that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) will issue proposed regulations to modify the Employer Information Report, known as the EEO-1, to include collecting pay data from employers with more than 100 employees. The EEOC says it needs this pay data to “assist . . . in identifying possible pay discrimination and assist employers in promoting equal pay in their workplaces.”

Word of Caution on Background Checks for Businesses Operating in Multiple States

Although federal laws and regulations cover most of the everyday employment issues you face, states still retain the right to create their own laws. And that’s where you need to be careful.

Employees on Social Media Outside of Work – Company Business or Not?

Tweets, Snaps, Instagram photos, and Facebook posts are just a few of the many ways individuals communicate through social media. No big surprise that social media has also infiltrated the workplace.  Employees use social media to interact before, during, and after work time on a daily basis. Most of the interaction is harmless. But, there are those instances when you will wish that technological advances had stopped with “rotary phones” and “party lines” [for those of you who have no idea what a rotary phone or party line is, “Google” it or ask “Siri.”].  

How to Set Salaries

Setting salaries for your staff is always a tricky thing to do. It's especially hard if you've never done it before, because you probably don't even know where to start. On the one hand, you want to pay enough to get the best possible talent. On the other hand, you don't want to overpay.

Here's a quick summary to help you set salaries for all your staff:

Driving Records Must Be Checked for any Employee that Drives for Business Purposes

If your business hires commercial drivers you understand the federal laws that require you to investigate and monitor the driving activities of your employees. These drivers must meet a number of federal standards, as well as those established by your insurance carriers. But what about those employees who don’t drive 18-wheelers, but instead are behind the wheel of a company or personal vehicle?