Encouraging Transportation Investment

<h3>GOAL: Improving the Condition and Performance of Michigan’s Transportation System</h3><p><strong>CHAMBER MEMBERS ADVOCATE:<br /></strong><br />•&nbsp;Ending Michigan’s status as a “donor state” for federal transportation funding.</p><p>•&nbsp;Substantially improving the efficiency and performance of Michigan’s transportation system by reducing overlap and duplication between state and local government agencies along with the implementation of other cost-saving reform measures.</p>

GOAL: Improving the Condition and Performance of Michigan’s Transportation System

CHAMBER MEMBERS ADVOCATE:

• Ending Michigan’s status as a “donor state” for federal transportation funding.

• Substantially improving the efficiency and performance of Michigan’s transportation system by reducing overlap and duplication between state and local government agencies along with the implementation of other cost-saving reform measures.

• Doubling Michigan’s investment in roads and public transportation through federal, state & local funding and financing options that ensure costs are borne primarily by users of the system.

WHY?

The cost and quality of a state’s transportation system (roads, bridges, air, rail, ports and public transit) has a major impact on economic growth.  For over 50 years Michigan taxpayers have sent far more gas tax revenue to Washington, D.C. than our state has received in return. We simply can no longer afford to heavily subsidize road and public transit projects in other states while Michigan’s transportation system suffers from a lack of investment. 

In May, 2010 the Michigan Chamber Foundation published a report by the Anderson Economic Group (AEG) entitled “Michigan’s Roads: The Cost of Doing Nothing and the Rewards of Bold Action.” The purpose of the report was to inform public discussion of the proper level of funding for building and maintaining Michigan’s roads infrastructure. The four key findings of the AEG report are: 1) doing nothing risks forfeiting $475 million in federal funds; 2) Doing nothing would cost the state 12,000 jobs. Bold action on road construction would create an additional 15,000 jobs; 3) Well maintained road infrastructure is critical to the success of manufacturing, agriculture and tourism; and 4) Michigan’s motorists experience more vehicle accidents and pay more for medical care and vehicle repairs because of poor road conditions.

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